Richard Hawley

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 24, 2008 1:02 pm 
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Hawley Super-Groupie
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Don't get much chance to get on forum much during day. Just a mini rant really. Get pretty fed up with the amount of union members these days that go into work despite a strike being called. I'm in civil service at moment (going into teacher training in Sept) and I'm really surprised at amount of schools/offices that are open. Just beieve that if you believe in trade unions, you follow the mandate. I remember me Dad going on strike quite a lot in 70's and you always knew it was the right thing to do even when thre wasn't much money about.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 24, 2008 4:21 pm 
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times change ol' son.

unions ain't what they were, we don't even have the same community of colleagues, as was.

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 24, 2008 7:44 pm 
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Too much time on my hands
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I didn't strike today as my union ( NASUWT) didn't give us the opportunity to vote on this issue - my experience of union people is they seem to cosy up to our employers on a regular basis. Only about 6 out of 150 teachers in my school took action - this is because the members of the NUT tend to be based in Primary schools and in London.
Both my kids were not in school today -quite difficult for us as my husband and I both were.
I am lucky as I am middle aged ,and have a house, car and all those things that I aspired to as a younger me. I get paid a reasonable amount for what I do, but I feel very sorry for young teachers who cannot afford mortgages without taking on second jobs,( I know plenty who work in pubs for instance) who definately can't afford to live down south ( as if you'd want to) and who are drowning in all the vast amount of paperwork that comes with the job nowadays.
Teaching is very rewarding, but also incrediably frustrating - not only badly behaved kids, but also badly behaved parents and pressure to always improve on last year's grades. There is definately an argument to allow people who do such a responsible job a realistic wage!
Sorry for a bit of an epic rant - I've been listening to politicans and other people who think they know about education on the radio -perhaps if they were in a classroom day on day in front of 30 kids, they might react differently!!!!!! :x


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 24, 2008 8:26 pm 
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I was in today as only one of our teaching staff is NUT.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 24, 2008 9:04 pm 
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I.....Need.....A.....Life
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I'm not a teacher...I did a 12 hour day today.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 24, 2008 9:11 pm 
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thats peanuts compared to most teachers. at school for 7:30am, home about 17:00 to 18:00pm then marking work or preparing lessons til midnight. i know cos me wife does it nearly every day.

my school was closed to the kids but we had to go in. we had 22 nut members off. i'm in unison and i represent the teaching assistants and it looks like we're on strike next.

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 24, 2008 10:36 pm 
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Hawleytastic!
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I sympathise with you, not got a lot of patience myself so could not really do yr job, chin up tho.... :wink:


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 25, 2008 12:33 am 
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Hawleytastic!
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It was not just the teachers on strike today, they seem to have taken the headlines.

It it a difficult decision to strike and lose a day's pay. Of course the strike is more effective if fully supported.

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 25, 2008 7:33 am 
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mph wrote:
thats peanuts compared to most teachers. at school for 7:30am, home about 17:00 to 18:00pm then marking work or preparing lessons til midnight. i know cos me wife does it nearly every day.


Yeah .....you're right, teaching must be really challenging.

Is it not tonight that you have your dressing up shindig?


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PostPosted: Mon May 19, 2008 11:33 am 
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Hawley Super-Groupie

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mph wrote:
thats peanuts compared to most teachers. at school for 7:30am, home about 17:00 to 18:00pm then marking work or preparing lessons til midnight. i know cos me wife does it nearly every day.

my school was closed to the kids but we had to go in. we had 22 nut members off. i'm in unison and i represent the teaching assistants and it looks like we're on strike next.


sorry mph, n i don't mean this personally or against your wife at all, but the whole "overworked teachers" thing is one of the best bluffs of all time. i work in a school as well, and to describe the life of a teacher the way you just did is so far into the realms of fantasy it's untrue.


Last edited by butchersdog on Mon May 19, 2008 8:57 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Mon May 19, 2008 12:09 pm 
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Hawleytastic!

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Perhaps the way individual teachers and schools work are different?


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PostPosted: Mon May 19, 2008 10:49 pm 
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merseybeatle wrote:
mph wrote:
thats peanuts compared to most teachers. at school for 7:30am, home about 17:00 to 18:00pm then marking work or preparing lessons til midnight. i know cos me wife does it nearly every day.

my school was closed to the kids but we had to go in. we had 22 nut members off. i'm in unison and i represent the teaching assistants and it looks like we're on strike next.


sorry mph, n i don't mean this personally or against your wife at all, but the whole "overworked teachers" thing is one of the best bluffs of all time. i work in a school as well, and to describe the life of a teacher the way you just did is so far into the realms of fantasy it's untrue.


utter bollocks. the wife is just having her 'tea' at 10:45pm after writing an inclusion policy for the stephen lawerence award for her school. what exactly do you do in your school then? we work in two tough inner city schools and i can assure you it's no picnic some days but i wouldn't change it for the world.

i find your comments bewildering but your entitled to your opinion. you're just wrong! :*:

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PostPosted: Mon May 19, 2008 11:00 pm 
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My brother teaches at a school in Bristol and my sister is teaching in Dubai. He works very, very long hours, she does not - although her teaching experience in Leicester, Wallington, Alderney and other UK places bears out what mph has said.

But there are probably exceptions to this.

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PostPosted: Tue May 20, 2008 1:21 pm 
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Hawley Super-Groupie

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mph wrote:
merseybeatle wrote:
mph wrote:
thats peanuts compared to most teachers. at school for 7:30am, home about 17:00 to 18:00pm then marking work or preparing lessons til midnight. i know cos me wife does it nearly every day.

my school was closed to the kids but we had to go in. we had 22 nut members off. i'm in unison and i represent the teaching assistants and it looks like we're on strike next.


sorry mph, n i don't mean this personally or against your wife at all, but the whole "overworked teachers" thing is one of the best bluffs of all time. i work in a school as well, and to describe the life of a teacher the way you just did is so far into the realms of fantasy it's untrue.


utter bollocks. the wife is just having her 'tea' at 10:45pm after writing an inclusion policy for the stephen lawerence award for her school. what exactly do you do in your school then? we work in two tough inner city schools and i can assure you it's no picnic some days but i wouldn't change it for the world.

i find your comments bewildering but your entitled to your opinion. you're just wrong! :*:


sorry mate, you're the one talking "bollocks". maybe you're the exception the rule, i don't know, but i'm sure the 12 weeks holiday a year make up for a few late nights.. which I find very hard to believe anyway. lets not forget the free periods in the middle of the working day either, if teachers got their finger out during them instead of sitting in the staff room chatting then maybe they wouldn't need to do as much work at night. i go out with a teacher and the concept of constant 'after hours marking' is nothing but an urban myth, something she admits herself, and she teaches biology through yr 7-11 and a level. yes, she does some, but the picture you paint of constant 18 hours days is laughable. Most teachers conveniently forget how they don't need to plan lessons from scratch year after year after year, because the syllabus changes are minimal. but we'll brush that under the carpet. My school, the teaching staff come in as close to 8:30 as possible and by 4 you can't see them for dust. Every teacher I've ever come into contact with, be it through work or socially, has had pretty much the same ride, so sorry if I don't suddenly change my mind.

I'm not really sure how you find my comments bewildering, most people say the same thing; the trouble with most teachers is they've been in education their entire lives, and it gets really old listening to them harp on about how tough life is out on the frontline; other so called "professional" jobs don't run for 37 weeks a year. an inner city school? ok, kids can be unruly now.. i'd be the first to admit that sometimes it'd be like working with one hand tide behind your back because of the lack of things you can do to punish kids now, but moan about long hours and 'rough' schools to the lads getting shot at in iraq for less money, or the police, nurses etc who all do a damn sight harder and more dangerous job, and longer shifts than teachers for less money, and they'll probably laugh in your face.. the benefits of teaching far outweigh the drawbacks. If teachers don't like it, they should get another job, simple. but lets face it, nobody in the private sector would pay them 22k starting salary a year for what they do, which, judging by the way year on year spelling, grammar, and basic maths standards are falling, is not much, not very well. that's not to say they shouldn't strike for more money though....


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PostPosted: Tue May 20, 2008 4:15 pm 
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Hawleytastic!

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MerseyBeatle, as you haven't said that you are a teacher yourself, and therefore can't really conceive of what goes on in reality in that job, then you really are talking bollocks!
Of course, maybe you could be a teacher... if only you had the brains.
You might be going out with a teacher now, but maybe not for long with such a disrespectful attitude towards her profession!


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